Review: The Piano

13 Jan 14

The Piano

The Piano

Ada and her nine-year-old daughter move to New Zealand to be with Ada’s new husband. Among their luggage is Ada’s piano, her most prized possession and her way of ‘speaking’ to the world. Ada is mute and the piano provides an outlet that allows her to express herself in a way that nothing else can.

When they arrive on the beach in their new home country, Ada is told that the piano is too heavy for the men to carry back to the house with all the other things. She knows that if she leaves it there, it will be destroyed by the waves, so she strikes a deal with a neighbour: she can have the piano back in exchange for certain favours.

I was pre-warned before seeing this movie that it might make me want to “set fire to my own face”, so I was expecting it to be completely awful.

It wasn’t quite as bad as I was expecting. It did drag on quite a bit, and the story wasn’t the most entertaining thing ever, but I felt no desire to set myself on fire. I didn’t really like Ada as a character, finding her irritating and a bit pathetic. I also disliked all the men in the film and felt absolutely no happiness on behalf of any of the characters when Ada finally got together with the man she’d decided she loved.

If you’re a fan of depressing period dramas, this might be up your street; it gives glimpses into another world and there are moments that are almost interesting, but ultimately there are several superior movies out there that will tell stories that aren’t quite so dull.

4/10 – A depressing movie that lacks storyline and characterisation